Some research indicates that the behavior of leaders or superiors in an organization is among the strongest influences on ethical behavior, playing a…

Some research indicates that the behavior of leaders or superiors in an organization is among the strongest influences on ethical behavior, playing a larger role than the actions of peers or, in some case, people’s individual ethical frameworks. When you are a leader, you are a role model. As such, your power may go far beyond your direct, immediate influence on your group’s work.

Often, group and team leaders are privy to information that other group members do not have. Organizations often communicate with groups only through their designated leaders. Thus, the leader is a gatekeeper for the group, a channel through whom information passes from superiors to the group and from the group back to those above.

Suppose that you are the leader of a team working on a project nearing completion. You are relieved, because the holidays are approaching rapidly, your group has been working night and day, and the project must be completed so that the exhausted group members can take some time off with their families. You schedule the final meeting for tomorrow, when the team will put the finishing touches on the project and you will tell them they can have some time off.

Your boss has just brought you a report from another team, which he believes may have a bearing on your project. You review the report, and while you understand your boss’s view, you don’t believe the other team’s data are really relevant to your project. If you forward the report to your group, they will have to take time to process it, which will cut into their much-needed vacation time.

Address how you might approach this situation. As a leader or manager, would you review the report with your team -or- would you let the team leave for vacation. Justify your reasoning.